Saturday, December 2, 2017

Seesaw - Notes from #EdCampR13 Session | #EdCamp

Students can post photos, audio, video, links, text, and and upload files to Seesaw.

Interesting use of Seesaw by teacher who is facilitating: Student filled out a behavior worksheet when she was off task. Then posted a pic of it to Seesaw and did an audio reflection on it. Parents can then see what happened and discuss at home later. (Personal thought: Would this make Seesaw less appealing to the students?)

Up to 10 family members can be given access to see students's work in Seesaw. In one case, a grandmother who lives out of state gets to see her grandchild's work and comments on it all the time. So cool!!! (Might want to let parents know they shouldn't invite someone who might be too judgmental.)

Types of Posts That Can be Made in Seesaw
One teacher shared that she teaches in a low SES area but has 100% participation from parents because they all have smartphones and can use the app! Parents can choose if they want to be notified by email or by an app notification when something is posted by their child. Parents only see their own students' work unless the teacher posts to the blog function. 

Students can comment on each others' work. The comment activity can be toggled on and off for specific activities in Seesaw. Great way to teach digital citizenship and appropriate online behavior. 

Can help students understand that this is their WOW work. Parents don't want to see pics of your shoes or the ceiling, etc.

In September, Seesaw just added the ability for teachers to create activities for students to do. Students complete in Seesaw. Example shown by facilitator was a template she made in Google Slides for demonstrating understanding of a multiplication problem. She downloaded as a PDF then uploaded to the Seesaw activity, and students were able to use the Seesaw tools to create.

Activities can be copied from class to class and even shared via link with another teacher!

Great for accountability! Can pull up activities and see who has completed them, then direct students accordingly.

Can download all activities as PDFs individually or the whole journal. Students could save the PDF to their Google Drive if you aren't using the paid version that allows the journal to follow the student from year to year.







All original work in this post by Sandy Kendell is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0). Please see specifics on my re-use policy before re-posting/re-using any of my blog content.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

#iOS11 - QR Code Reader is Built In

If you and your students have access to iPads, iPhones, or iPod Touches running iOS 11, you can now scan bar codes without having to install a QR code reader app!

Just open the Camera app, point it at the QR code you want to read, and press the message that pops up on the screen to visit the website or file the code links to. It's that simple! I demonstrate how easy it is to use the iOS QR code reading function in the video below. 

I also share my all-time favorite QR code reading app, i-nigma, which is compatible with iOS devices (helpful if you have older devices that can't run iOS 11 or even newer devices that just haven't been upgraded yet) as well as Android (which is great in mixed-device environments like you find in  BYOD/BYOT classrooms). 

If you are wondering why anyone would need a QR code reader in their classroom, take a look at my Pinterest board with QR code ideas or my YouTube QR Code playlist. I update both of these when I come across new ideas, so feel free to check them frequently!

If you have ideas for using QR codes in the classroom, please share them in the comments so we can all learn together.






All original work in this post by Sandy Kendell is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0). Please see specifics on my re-use policy before re-posting/re-using any of my blog content.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Screen Recording is Built in to #iPad & #iPhone Running #iOS11

With the release of iOS 11 in September of 2017 came a great new feature which can have multiple uses in classrooms. The ability to video record what is happening on an iPad or iPhone screen, as well as narrate over the recording, is now a built-in feature of iOS devices.

You may not realize that the screen recording feature is an option because it is not turned on by default when you upgrade to iOS 11. I found out about it through Twitter myself.

Below are instructions for turning on screen recording and using it for the first time.


To turn on the Screen Recording feature, follow these steps:

Tap the Green Circle next to Screen Recording
to enable the function on your iOS device
  • Open the Settings app on your iOS device.
  • Scroll down Control Center and tap on it.
  • Tap on Customize Controls.
  • Under More Controls, tap on the green circle with white plus mark next to Screen Recording.
  • Screen Recording will now be moved up to the Include section of the Control Center settings.

In the Control Center,
press and hold on the 

Screen Recording button
to bring up Audio options.

Access and use the Screen Recording function by:

  • Swiping up from the bottom of your device to bring up the Control Center.
  • Decide if you want audio via the device microphone (your voice) on your recording. Press and hold the white circle icon until the Screen Recording options come up. Then tap the microphone to toggle audio recording on and off. 
  • Tap Start Recording. You will see a 3 second countdown on the screen. Press the Home Button on your device to go back to your device's home screen during that 3 seconds so your recording will start there.
  • You will know recording has started and is ongoing when you see a red bar across the top of your device's screen.
  • To end your recording, tap the red bar at the top of your screen. Then press Stop.

Video Demo of iOS Screen Recording

In the video below, I demonstrate Screen Recording on an iPhone. I also share a few tips for making your screen recording projects better as well as a few ideas for how to get the video off of the device once it is recorded.





Slides From the Video

Since I recorded my video on an iPhone, the information on the slides is kind of small! You can view the slides that are in the video below.







Have you used the iOS Screen Recording feature in teaching and learning? Have your students? If so, please share in the comments so we can learn from your ideas. Thanks!











All original work in this post by Sandy Kendell is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0). Please see specifics on my re-use policy before re-posting/re-using any of my blog content.